Tag Archives: Course Setting

Upload Courses and Maps to Livelox

Livelox is a web-based application for analysis of routes from orienteering races.

As an organizer of orienteering trainings or competitions, you can publish maps and courses to Livelox to let spectators follow the competitors in real time, and to let participants analyze their route choices post-race.

Now it’s possible to upload courses and maps from OCAD directly to Livelox.

How it works

Orienteering With Virtual Controls

The Corona Pandemic created the need to offer orienteering trainings which can be done individually and over a longer period of time.

In this blog we present 2 nice (and free) apps, which make orienteering courses available year round with no need for flags to mark the control points. Instead, the apps track your location via GPS from your smartphone and make a sound when you have found the control points.

The two apps we have tested are:

MapRunF, developed by a keen orienteer in Brisbane Australia.

UsynligO, developed by Trond Benum from Norway.

To set up a new event, both apps require a map file and a course setting file. These can be easily created and exported with OCAD. Due to the use of GPS, it is important that the files are georeferenced correctly.

For a new map we recommend to start it with the New Map Wizard. In addition to the correct georeferencing, geodata can be imported directly. But also old maps can be georeferenced afterwards.

The georeferenced map file can then be loaded as background map in the course setting project. Now the courses can be set.

MapRun

To upload maps and courses to MapRunF, you need to export…

BTW: The map above was created within 5′ by importing Open Data with New Map Wizard and processing LiDAR Data with the DEM Wizard.

UsynligO

To upload maps and courses to UsynligO, you need to export…

  • The course setting project itself as PDF via menu File > Export >PDF

For more information about the apps, please visit their websites.

The information above is also available in our Wiki.

How to use OCAD and LiDAR to Calculate Climbing for Courses

In order to indicate the climbing for courses, many course setters invest a lot of time to manually add up the climbing along the optimal route. If a terrain model (DEM) is available, this can be done easier with OCAD. With the following workflow, which is also possible in the OCAD Course Setting Edition, the climbing can be calculated automatically to a certain extent:

  1. Start a course setting project, open a background map and draw a course.

2. In your course setting project, go to menu DEM > Open and open your terrain model (* _DTM.ocdDem). This file is generated during the LiDAR processing.

3. Now draw a line with the optimal route from start to finish. This has to be done for each course. Use any line symbol in the symbol box or create a new one.

4. Select one of these optimal routes and go to menu DEM > Create Profile. You will get a Total ascent value, which you can enter into Course Setting > Courses > Climb used.

In the Courses dialogue, there is also a Climb calculated value, which is just calculated automatically by adding the net ascent from each control to the next one. The value that is entered in Climb used will show up in the control description.

Upload to SPORTident Center

SPORTident has launched a major update in June 2020 of its Orienteering App.

Thanks to a cooperation between OCAD and SPORTident, the latest OCAD Update includes the function Upload to SPORTident Center.

SPORTident Center is the results platform for orienteering events. Maps and courses created with OCAD can be imported directly into a new or existing event in SPORTident Center and are immediately available in the Orienteering App afterwards.

Have a look at the example of a small event yourself.

More about the Upload fom OCAD to SPORTident Center:

More about the SPORTident Orienteering App:

Upload To SPORTident Center

Map Scale

Choosing the right map scale for a project, be it a mapping or a course setting project, is not difficult in most cases.
However, it can quickly become complicated depending on the requirements.

Example: How to approach a Long Distance competition with three different scales?

We have created an OCAD Wiki page Map Scale which deals with this topic, both in terms of mapping and course setting.

Certainly worth a look!